Understanding Reggae Lyrics

Published: 15th August 2008
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There are millions of Reggae music fans across the world. Reggae music is often sung in the local Jamaican dialect called Patois. However, not all fans of Reggae can speak or understand Jamaican Patois. Avid fans of Reggae music, who are not Jamaican patois speakers, can attest to the fact that at

times there are words in the music that he or she cannot understand. This article will list some Jamaican Patois words frequently found in Reggae music. The meanings of those Patois words will also be given.



Here are some Reggae related Patois words often found in the music



jum pan - noisy awful music



bruk wile - to dance excitedly



buss di dace - do the dance (usually refers to the newest and latest dance)



dibby - inferior



soun bwoy - an insulting word used to refer to a disc jockey



selectah - disc jockey



wheel (up) - rewind the music



boom soun - the best sound, the best sounding disc jockey



clash - disc jockeys competing with each other to play the latest and best songs



bashment - a party, a concert



Patois is a dialect full of imaginative and varied words. A word that means one thing in one context can have a totally different meaning when used in another context. If you'd like to learn more Jamaican

Patois visit http://www.speakingjamaican.com



There are millions of Reggae music fans across the world. Some Reggae artists prefer to deliver their lyrics in Patois. However, quite a number of Reggae artists sing in Standard English but even they at

times use Patois words, in their songs, from time to time.



By listening to Reggae music often, many people have built up a familiarity with Jamaican Patois, often without knowing what the word(s) mean initially. Often a Jamaican friend is used as a source of reference. This article provided a short list of a few common words often used in Reggae music.



I write about travel and foreign cultures

Learn Jamaican using audio http://www.speakingjamaican.com

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